Topical Tacrolimus

Topical tacrolimus is a new vitiligo treatment that has similar efficacy to topical steroids and minor adverse effects, such as a moderate burning sensation after application and a transient flushing of the skin after consuming alcohol.

 

Topical Tacrolimus for Vitiligo

Patients with vitiligo can benefit from topical tacrolimus treatment. Alternative than in the vulgaris form, we urge that topical tacrolimus be investigated as a treatment for two difficult-to-treat varieties of vitiligo, acrofacialis and segmentalis, before evaluating other options.

How does Topical Tacrolimus treat Vitiligo?

In vitiligo patches, Protopic appears to have unique properties in inhibiting the immune response. It works in a similar way to steroid therapy, but without the negative side effects. When the loss of pigment is recent and active, protopic ointment has proven to be highly helpful on the faces of some patients with vitiligo. Unfortunately, like steroid creams, protopic does not work for everyone.

Protopic comes in two strengths, with the gentler ointment (.03 percent strength) being reserved for children. Although it is not licensed, GPs can prescribe Protopic for vitiligo. A dermatologist may recommend it, but the GP must write the prescription.

Research & Effecitiveness of Topical Tacrolimus

Vitiligo is typically treated with topical corticosteroids and phototherapy. The acrofacial and segmental forms, on the other hand, are frequently insensitive to these treatments. A few studies on the efficacy of topical tacrolimus in the treatment of vitiligo, including vulgaris and segmental forms, have been undertaken recently. The acrofacial form, however, has never been studied with this topical therapy. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment in vitiligo patients of all types. In this study, 42 vitiligo patients were included.

For six months, they were given 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment twice daily. Only 38 of the 42 patients were able to finish the treatment regimen. The patients were 27.8 years old on average. The percentage of those that responded was 76.09 percent. The maximum response rate for the vulgaris and focalis was 94.12%. The segmentalis and acrofacialis response rates were 76.92 percent and 56.25 percent, respectively.

There were significant differences in response, age groups, kinds, and location of vitiligo. Children had nearly nine times the chance of having a better response to treatment than adults . A better response was also seen in patients with a disease duration of less than 5 years. Finally, patients with vitiligo can benefit from topical tacrolimus treatment. Alternative than in the vulgaris form, we urge that topical tacrolimus be investigated as a treatment for two difficult-to-treat varieties of vitiligo, acrofacialis and segmentalis, before evaluating other options.

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